Savory Recipes

Coconut Flour Crackers

1 cup coconut flour
4 eggs
¼ cup butter, lard, or tallow
3 cups shredded cheese
¼ teaspoon sea salt
¼ teaspoon garlic powder
¼ teaspoon oregano

Mix all ingredients in food processor or blender. On a cookie sheet, thinly roll dough between two pieces of parchment paper. Pull off the top piece of parchment. Bake at 400° F for 5-10 minutes. Cut into pieces, flip, and bake for another 5-10 minutes. Enjoy!

Savory Recipes

Cauliflower Pizza Crust

4 cups fresh or frozen, but thawed, cauliflower
4 cups shredded cheese
½ cup butter, lard, or tallow
2 eggs
½ teaspoon sea salt
½ teaspoon garlic powder
½ teaspoon oregano

Pulse cauliflower in food processor or blender until cauliflower is the size of rice. Mix remaining ingredients with cauliflower. Spread in circles on cookie sheet lined with parchment paper. Bake at 450° F for 15-20 minutes until golden brown. Top with sauce, meat, and cheese. Enjoy!

Sweet Recipes

Chocolate Coconut Cream Candy

7 ounce block of coconut cream
1/2 cup raw cocoa powder
1/3 cup raw honey
2 tablespoons water
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/8 teaspoon sea salt
1 cup nuts of your choice, chopped or whole

Stir first 6 ingredients in pan on stovetop over medium heat until coconut cream is melted and mixture is combined. Remove from heat. Stir in nuts. Spread mixture in 8×8 inch pan. Place in refrigerator until firm. Enjoy!

Savory Recipes

Nacho Cheese Crackers

5 cups almond flour
3 cups shredded cheese
1 tsp sea salt
1 tsp cumin
1 tsp cayenne
1/3 cup water

Mix all ingredients. Roll thinly onto two 9 x 13 inch cookie sheets. Bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for 7 minutes. Cut and flip pieces. Return to oven and bake for another 7 minutes. Cool. Enjoy!

Adapted from Comfy Belly’s Nacho Cheese Chips.

Musings

I Believe in Hope

When did hope lose its meaning? When did it go from hanging out with its support team of faith and love to being in the wrong crowd with fat chance and cold day in hell? When did people stop believing in hope?

As a child I was frequently told “don’t get your hopes up.” But I wasn’t the only one and it’s still happening today. As a society we are constantly told and sold the belief system of “muddling through” and “just getting by” from the pharmaceuticals that offer more side effects than relief from symptoms, without hope for a cure, to lottery tickets with impossible odds to the nightly news spewing crime and violence as headlines.

Hope needs an intervention. We need a conversation with hope to remind it and ourselves of its true nature. That real hope and belief in miracles is possible. Not the watered-down pie-in-the-sky hope of “good luck with that”, “let’s not get our hopes up,” because “there’s a slim chance” of a cure, or winning, or even survival. Are we so afraid of disappointment that we no longer believe in hope?

“I believe that imagination is stronger than knowledge. That myth is more potent than history. That dreams are more powerful than facts. That hope always triumphs over experience. That laughter is the only cure for grief. And I believe that love is stronger than death.” ― Robert Fulghum

I left the highly supportive world of autism support groups in 2010 when our family moved to Minnesota. Finding that the local group in our new town had recently disbanded and that my son, with the healing power of real nourishing food, no longer needed an I.E.P. (ticket to special education) for autistic traits he no longer possessed, I felt no void, until recently.

The lead character in my children’s books is a marmot. The books are our stories ON (Moby’s First Day of Kindergarten is about autism acceptance and peer advocacy) and OFF (Moby’s First Day of Summer Vacation is about the healing power of food) the autism spectrum. So I reached out to see if I could set up a table at a local autism awareness event to share information about my books and my upcoming community education gut-healing cooking classes. Healing the digestive system is effective treatment for autism and other mental and physical illnesses and conditions. Real food is not snake oil hope, it works. Given real nourishing food, our bodies know how to heal. That’s real hope to get families out of the muddling through world of therapies and accommodations into freedom of possibilities. Don’t get me wrong, the work done by therapists, social workers, and support staff is necessary and helpful while the body heals. My first book is all about using the tools and tips from these helping professions.

At this autism awareness event under a local park pavilion, I was one of three informational tables all in a row – one table manned by a representative from the state autism society, another one by a local occupational therapist, and then my table. This first time event was well attended. Interestingly, many people gave my table a wide berth on the way to visit the other two tables. It’s not like I even brought my signature Avocado Chocolate Pudding (although maybe I should have), I was just standing there with my books, stuffed animals, and pamphlets. 11056554_10204988563614764_5701123969913562814_n A handful of hopeful people did approach my table interested in my knowledge and experience, but it wasn’t many, which got me thinking. I left the autism community and nothing has changed. “The Experts” upon diagnosis delivery still fail to mention effective dietary intervention to parents just like back in 2004 when we were told “there is no cure for autism” only a daily professionally directed and often medicated navigation through meltdowns and odd behaviors.

Toward the end of the event, I inquired with the very kind representative from the state autism organization on how I could submit a presentation proposal for the state autism convention. She gladly filled me in on the submission process, and then cautioned that I could not mention healing or cure. Funny how it’s acceptable to cruelly proclaim a lack of a cure, but not a cure. As a Certified GAPS™ Practitioner, I claim that gut-healing real nourishing food offers effective treatment for autism. The state autism representative agreed that the wording of “effective treatment” is acceptable. Consider this, treatment is okay because it doesn’t get people’s hopes up too high, but a cure for and healing of autism is irresponsible. We were given no hope for our son’s future. We proved them wrong, my son is no longer on the autism spectrum and his future IS FULL OF HOPE.

Since my discussion that day, I was hit with yet another hope deluding recommendation to limit my verbiage, which makes me dig in my hopeful heels even deeper. A fellow business group companion cautioned that I should not even use the words “effective treatment”, but rather “may alleviate symptoms” would be easier for people to swallow. But I like feeding people real nourishing spoonfuls of hope and will continue to do so. I believe in the power of hope.

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“Hope is the thing with feathers
That perches in the soul
And sings the tune without the words
And never stops at all.”
― Emily Dickinson

Savory Recipes

Chicken and Cauliflower Rice Casserole

1/4 cup lard or butter
1 onion, chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 cup bone broth
1 bag of frozen broccoli florets or 3 cups fresh chopped broccoli
1 large box of mushrooms
1 teaspoon sea salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
2 bags of frozen cauliflower, thawed, or 2 heads of fresh cauliflower
3 cups cooked cubed chicken
2 cups homemade yogurt
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
1/2 teaspoon onion powder
1/2 teaspoon celery powder
2-3 cups cheese

Sauté onion and garlic in lard or butter. Add broth, broccoli, mushrooms, salt, and pepper. Briefly pulse cauliflower in a food processor until size of rice. Stir in cauliflower. Simmer until cauliflower is done. Spoon into 9 x 13 inch pan. Layer chicken on top of cauliflower rice mixture. Spread mixture of yogurt, salt, garlic powder, onion powder, and celery powder over chicken. Sprinkle with cheese. Bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit until bubbly. Enjoy!